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Update: 03.01.18   Links: 05.01.18

CPR For Baby, Child, Teen, Adult
 not breathing,
not responding, grunting, gasping or snorting


MAJOR CHANGE
in CPR for Teens and Adults
Hands-only - no mouth to mouth. Click for video

Call 9-1-1 in U.S. and Canada
Worldwide emergency phones
click here

Instruction Index:
  • TEENS ADULTS HANDS-ONLY
  • BABY CPR INSTRUCTIONS
  • CHILD (8 & under) CPR
  • ADULT (AGE 8+)TRADITIONAL CPR
  • VIDEOS, INFO, CLASSES, APPS
  • __________________
     Two free mobile training apps for the iPhone and Android Phones.
    CPR-U of Washington School of Medicine - Excellent Guide + Videos
    To Help Someone Not Breathing, Moving, Responding
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    Related pages:  Heimlich Maneuver Institute  CPR Animal  All Emergency Help Page


    HANDS-ONLY CPR
    TEENS ADULTS
    return to index

    MAJOR CHANGE IN CPR FOR TEENS AND ADULTS - HANDS-ONLY CPR - 2017
    American Heart Association
    "Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR for cardiac arrest at home, at work or in public spaces," "According to the American Heart Association, about 90 percent of people who suffer out of hospital cardiac arrests die. CPR, especially if performed immediately, can double or triple a cardiac arrest victim's chance of survival."

    "Hands-Only CPR has just two easy steps, performed in this order
    (1) Call 9-1-1 in U.S. and Canada, click here emergency phones worldwide if you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse; and (2) Push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the beat of a familiar song that has 100 to 120 beats per minute.  Song examples include "Stayin'Alive" by the Bee Gees, "Crazy in Love" by Beyoncé featuring Jay-Z, "Hips Don't Lie" by Shakira" or "Walk the Line" by Johnny Cash."

    Click TO WATCH VIDEO (Hands-Only CPR Fact Sheet)

    BABY CPR INSTRUCTIONS   return to index
    FIRST
  • Get somebody to call EMERGENCY immediately
    Call 9-1-1 in U.S. and Canada, click here emergency phones worldwide
  • If you are alone do CPR for 2 full minutes before calling.

    The following 2 procedures are no longer recommended:
    Do not try to check pulse.
    Do not remove water from lungs if drowning.
    Water in the lungs does not obstruct CPR and attempting to remove it may cause damage.

    Risk: There is no documentation that HIV or AIDS has ever been transmitted by CPR. Documentation 29 August 2017 promedcert.com

    STEPS ON HOW TO DO CPR ON A BABY


    If no one else is around,
    read ALL of the following below and do the cycle for 2 full minutes before calling emergency, and then continue CPR)

    1. If baby does not respond to tapping on shoulder or a shout, lay baby on its back.

    2. Open mouth with fingers and be sure that tongue is not blocking throat. Do not do this without looking. Use finger sweep to remove any blockage. Do not do a blind finger sweep. Look at what you are doing.

    3. If not possible neck injury, place hand on forehead and other hand under chin, and gently tilt head back to free tongue so as not to block windpipe.

    4. Cover mouth and nose with your mouth or hold nose shut and blow 2 times (chest should rise).
    If air does not seem to be going through or chest does NOT rise when doing breaths, look inside mouth, and do a finger sweep to remove any blockage. Do not do a blind finger sweep. Look at what you are doing.

    5. NOW, put middle two fingers (3rd and 4th) in middle of chest just below level of nipples.

    6. Gently press down 30 times about 1/3 of depth of chest at a rate of a little less than about 2 per second (100 per minute)

    7. CYCLE:
        2 breaths (both mouth and nose covered) and then
      30 chest presses (a little less than 2 per second) with middle fingers

    8. If you feel pulse return, continue with breaths only.

    9. Continue until there is movement or rescue team comes.

    10. If baby vomits, turn the head to the side and try to sweep out or wipe off the vomit.
    Continue with CPR.


    return


    CHILD CPR INSTRUCTIONS (AGE 8 OR UNDER)   return to index
    FIRST
  • Get somebody to call EMERGENCY immediately
    Call 9-1-1 in U.S. and Canada, click here emergency phones worldwide
  • If you are alone do CPR for 2 full minutes before calling.

    The following 2 procedures are no longer recommended:
    Do not try to check pulse.
    Do not remove water from lungs if drowning.
    Water in the lungs does not obstruct CPR and attempting to remove it may cause damage.

    Risk: There is no documentation that HIV or AIDS has ever been transmitted by CPR.  Documentation 29 August 2017 promedcert.com

    STEPS ON HOW TO DO CPR ON A CHILD

    (If you are alone, do steps 1 thru 6 and do the cycle 2 full minutes before calling emergency, and then continue CPR)

    1.
    Place on back

    2. Look inside mouth using finger sweep to remove any blockage. Do not do a blind finger sweep. Look at what you are doing.

    3. If not possibility of neck injury, gently tilt head back to free tongue from blocking windpipe (hand on forehead and other hand under chin)

    4. Hold nose shut - cover mouth with your mouth and give 2 breaths (each 2 seconds and see chest rise)
    If air does not seem to be going through or chest does NOT rise when doing breaths, look inside mouth using finger sweep to remove any blockage. Do not do a blind finger sweep. Look at what you are doing.

    5. Then put heel of one hand on the center of the chest (midway between nipples)

    6. Press down about 1/3 of depth of chest 30 times at a rate of a little less than about 2 per second (100 per minute)

    7.
    CYCLE: Repeat 2 breaths and 30 chest press

    8. If you feel pulse return, continue with breaths only

    9. Continue until there is movement or rescue team comes

    10. If child vomits, turn the head to the side and try to sweep out or wipe off the vomit. Continue with CPR.

    return


    ADULT TRADITIONAL CPR INSTRUCTIONS (ANYONE OVER 8 YEARS OLD  return index
  • Very IMPORTANT: CALL EMERGENCY FIRST for individuals over age 8 if at all possible and then do CPR (the older the individual, the greater the possibility of a heart problem and the need for professional care as soon as possible)

  • If other people, have someone call EMERGENCY immediately
    Call 9-1-1 in U.S. and Canada, click here emergency phones worldwide
  • Even if you are alone call EMERGENCY immediately (911 in US, click for emergency phones worldwide)

    The following 2 procedures are no longer recommended:
    Do not try to check pulse.
    Do not remove water from lungs if drowning.
    Water in the lungs does not obstruct CPR and attempting to remove it may cause damage.

    Risk: There is no documentation that HIV or AIDS has ever been transmitted by CPR. Documentation 29 August 2017 promedcert.com


    CPR doubles a person's chance of survival from sudden cardiac arrest. [Eisenberg]

    What are CPR procedures for an adult
    IMPORTANT: CALL EMERGENCY FIRST if at all possible due to possibility of heart attack or other emergency event.

    1. Place on back

    2. Open mouth with fingers and be sure that tongue or something else is not blocking throat. Do not do this without looking. Use finger sweep to remove any blockage. Do not do a blind finger sweep. Look at what you are doing.

    3. If not possibility of neck injury, place hand on forehead and other hand under chin, and gently tilt head back to free tongue so not blocking windpipe

    4. Hold nose shut - cover mouth with your mouth and give 2 breaths (each 1.5-2 seconds and see chest rise)
    If air does not seem to be going through or chest does NOT rise when doing breaths, look inside mouth using finger sweep to remove any blockage. Do not do a blind finger sweep. Look at what you are doing.

    5. Put heel of one hand midway between nipples and put other hand on top of first

    6. Press down 30 times to a depth of about 1 1/2 to 2 inches at a rate of a little less than about 2 per second (100 per minute)

    7. CYCLE: Repeat 2 breaths followed by 30 chest presses

    8. If you feel pulse return, continue with breaths only

    9. Continue until movement or rescue team comes

    10. If person vomits, turn the head to the side and try to sweep out or wipe off the vomit. Continue with CPR.    return
    ____________________


     VIDEOS, INFO, INSTRUCTION, CLASSES, APPS   return to index

    Extra procedure which may add to effectiveness of CPR
    (procedure not yet approved by American Heart Association)
    Studies indicate that if another person presses down gently on the stomach above naval, immediately after the chest is pressed down, the recovery rate is greater. Must be done in rhythm. See discussion below. Source: See Purdue.edu below.

    If person was drowning, do not attempt to remove water from person.
    "There is no evidence that water acts as an obstructive foreign body, and time should not be wasted in attempting to remove water from the victim. Such maneuvers can cause injury but--more importantly--will delay CPR, particularly support of airway and ventilation." [AHA 001]


    For definitions, lessons, mobile apps, information on CPR

    LEARN CPR

     University of Washington School of Medicine

    For a list of frequently asked and answered questions
    ASK THE DOCTOR
     University of Washington School of Medicine

    ALSO SEE

    Guidelines for CPR & Emergency
    Guidelines for CPR & Emergency Cardiovascular Care, 2017
    American Heart Association

    Abdominal Compression Only, 2007
    New CPR promises better results by compressing abdomen, not chest

    Rhythmic abdominal and chest compression by 2 persons, 2013
    The Case for Inteposed Abdominal Compression ... - Purdue e-Pubs
     CF Babbs - ‎2013
    IAC stands for interposed abdominal compression. IAC-CPR includes all the steps of conventional external cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with the addition of interposed abdominal compressions by a second or third rescuer, applied in counterpoint to the rhythm of chest compression. Pulses of central abdominal pressure are applied with overlapping hands just headward of the umbilicus alternating with chest compressions. Scattered early reports published between 1957 and 1980 hinted at the virtue of abdominal binding and abdominal compression in the resuscitation of children and animals from cardiac arrest. In the decade of the 1980s extensive studies in animals and in electronic models suggested a rough doubling of systemic blood flow when interposed abdominal compressions were added to otherwise standard CPR. In the 1990s randomized clinical trials involving several hundred patients showed a doubling of immediate resuscitation success and longer term survival with IAC-CPR, compared to standard CPR. American Heart Association committees on emergency cardiovascular care are currently evaluating, IAC-CPR in evidence-based reviews of national Guidelines for both basic and advanced life support. Blayne Roeder Charles F. Babbs, MD, PhD


    The Traditional Procedures have been approved by Dr. Mickey Eisenberg
    Mickey Eisenberg M.D. at learncpr@u.washington.edu
    University of Washington School of Medicine


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